Close

Site Information

Side Effects of Gallbladder Removal

Side Effects of Gallbladder Removal

One of the side effects of gallbladder removal can be the dumping of bile which is now not as easily regulated and can send someone running to the bathroom immediately after eating. A more common side effect is a decrease in the secretion of bile. If the bile produced by the liver becomes thick and sluggish, painful symptoms and bile stones can occur. Bile stones can form in the liver as well as the gallbladder. One woman had her gallbladder removed only to end up back in surgery again two or three days later where they found stones in the bile ducts of the liver causing her alot of pain.

However, removing the gallbladder may be an absolute medical necessity but, unless it is diseased, ruptured or otherwise sick, know that just having cholelithiasis or gallbladder stones does not mean you have to take it out. If you have gallbladder attacks, pain or discomfort or digestive problems but not a diseased gallbladder, this does not mean you necessarily have to have gallbladder surgery. Get a second opinion.
You do have an option of cleaning up your diet, doing some work on your gallbladder and liver and keeping your organ of fat digestion. If you happen to think that nature made a mistake and that you don't need it anyway, you probably wouldn't be reading this page in the first place.

What's the worst thing that can happen? You try to clean up your act - spend time eating healthy and detoxing the bile and liver and...the gallbladder still needs to come out!

The most common problems, apart from actual pain are impaired digestion: bloating, gas, heartburn, constipation or diarrhea. You are/were already having trouble digesting fats. So why would removing the organ that regulates the metabolizer of fats improve your digestion? It may help with the pain, but know that 34% of people who have their gallbladder removed still experience some abdominal pain. (4)

The easiest way to avoid this is to take a supplement of bile salts or choline with meals to help your body with the digestion of fats or to take our herbal digestive bitters  before or after each meal.  And do a series of gallbladder flushes. Flushes are especially helpful after gallbladder removal to help flush out the bile ducts.


Supplemental bile salts, (unless you are experiencing bile dumping) available separately or in the After Gallbladder Removal Kit, should be taken frequently along with the digestive stimulant Bitters to help stimulate your own digestive juices. Alternating the dosage of bile salts will help to mimic the body's way of secreting bile. For example, take one with breakfast, two at lunch, three at dinner, two with breakfast the next day, and so on in rotation.

If you have the less common, but not unusual side effect after gallbladder removal of needing to run to the bathroom immediately after eating, you are probably getting too much bile instead of too little. This, unfortunately is much harder to control. Clay is sometimes helpful as are some medications that bind up the bile.

 CAN I FUNCTION WITHOUT A GALLBLADDER

Yes you can. The bile will still be produced in the liver and find its way to the small intestine. It will continue to break down your dietary fats and to remove toxins from the liver. What is different is that the bile will no longer be as concentrated (the gallbladder removes 90% of the water from the bile) and its function as a regulator will be gone. Some people have no problem with this at all; others have problems with getting the right amount of bile at the right time, either too much or too little.

IS GALLBLADDER SURGERY EFFECTIVE

What is meant by effective? Will you never have another gallbladder attack? I mean, how could you if you have no gallbladder, right? Will you never suffer from indigestion again? Will your gas and bloating disappear? Will the constipation go away? Will diarrhea resolve?

The answer to all of the above is "sometimes". Actual attacks are rare, but other forms of pain and discomfort are possible and new symptoms can also develop. Read on...

Let's look at gallbladder attacks. Gallstones can also be found in the liver and the bile ducts leading to the gallbladder. The attack is often (but not always) caused by a stone blocking a duct. And yes, this can still happen. As seen by research above, stones are formed partly due to what we eat. If we take the gallbladder out and continue to eat the same lithogenic forming diet that we did before, why should stones not form? They will. You may never know it. You may be asymptomatic for the rest of your life. Or, you may get a stone stuck in a bile duct. This is one of the reasons for the most frequently asked question on this site: "I had my gallbladder removed months (or years) ago. Why do I still have pain?" (See testimonials for examples.) Removing the gallbladder does not always address the problem in the body that is causing these or other symptoms listed above. It has probably taken years for your body to form these stones. Your fat digestion has been impaired for a long time. In order to break down and digest fats, your body must produce bile, which is done in the liver. To address the root of the problem you must study and reflect on the causes of gallbladder disease. There could be an underlying thyroid problem which research connects with both gallstones and a low-functioning gallbladder. Food allergies may also be a big part of it and stress as well.


Another thing to keep in mind is that you could have another gallbladder disease that has not yet been diagnosed. For example, if an ultrasound is done and gallstones found, a cholecystectomy or gallbladder removal will be recommended without doing any further exploration. This is because the most obvious and easily diagnosed cause of gallbladder attacks is gallstones or cholelithiasis. And ultrasound is quick and non-invasive. However, if your gallbladder is ejecting bile below 33%-40% which is considered normal range, you would be diagnosed with a low-functioning gallbladder or biliary dyskinesia. This can only be determined with a HIDA scan which is an invasive procedure using radioactive dye. Symptoms of biliary dyskinesia are not always resolved with cholecystectomy either for various known and unknown reasons. One reason is that the problem could be with the Sphincter of Oddi rather than the gallbladder itself.

{"customer_email":"", "customer_id": "", "product_id":"", "grand_total": "", "sub_total":"", "shipping_cost": "", "handling_cost": "" }